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FAQ Dealing With Faults

Computers, like all kinds of technology, don’t always do what we want them to do. Sometimes, we’re trying to get a particular task carried out and we can’t figure out why it’s not working or the hardware just completely fails and you don’t know why there’s a computer error. Many computer problems actually have a straightforward solution and so we have compiled a list of questions on common computer issues and the possible solutions for them.


Getting Started:


Q: I have connected everything, switched it on and nothing happens?
A: If you want your mini itx motherboard to start when the power is applied, you must set the power status in the BIOS to Status After PowerFail=ON. Otherwise, short the power button pins at the front panel header of the motherboard.


Q: My motherboard powers up, but there’s no BIOS beep?
A: Check your RAM is the correct voltage (1·5V, 1·35V), is the correct speed (PC2-6400 etc) and is seated properly. Also, check that your motherboard has a preferred SODIMM slot for when using a solitary memory module.


Q: I am getting a persistent session of beeps from the motherboard when I start it, why?
A: The BIOS is telling you there is a fundamental problem stopping the BIOS complete its power-on-self-test (POST). Usually it is a poor RAM. At worst, it is a video fault. The groups of beeps usually translate to a lookup table of types of errors.


Q: I have connected the big 24pin ATX connector from the PSU, but the motherboard doesn’t boot up?
A: Check that the 4pin 12 volt CPU supply is connected. The motherboard won’t start without it.


Q: Windows is telling me it can’t be installed on this partition, why?
A: The partition you specified is too small or your hard drive has an existing OS taking up all the space.


Q: Why can’t Windows installation see my brand-new mSATA?
A: The slot it’s in may be mini-PCIe only, and not mini-SATA. Move it to a slot that supports either mini-SATA or both outright. If it’s the only slot on the motherboard, there may be a jumper that needs moving to change the slot’s function to being that of mini-SATA. Be aware that some slots share a SATA port and there may be a jumper for that designation too.


Getting Restarted:


Q: I set the OPTIMAL DEFAULTS in the BIOS and now Windows won’t boot. It keeps restarting?
A: Setting OPTIMAL DEFAULTS may change the SATA setting away from its original state when Windows was installed, especially if you have a RAID array. Try each setting of RAID/AHCI/IDE.


Q: My CMOS battery fell out. How do I get my LCD display back and Windows booting again?
A: First step; put the CMOS battery back. Next connect a VGA monitor to your motherboard to access the BIOS. In the BIOS, set the SATA to the correct mode e.g. RAID/AHCI/IDE and then set your default boot display to be LCD. Don’t forget to reconfigure the specifics for your LCD, i.e. bits (32 or 64), single or dual channel mode and resolution.


Q: Why is my BIOS unable to reuse a hard disk from a RAID array?
A: The HDD is still marked as a member-disk of that array. In your host system, set the SATA mode as RAID. Reboot with your HDD connected and press CTRL-I to access the RAID firmware. In the RAID firmware, highlight the HDD and select to delete the RAID array or remove it from membership. Reboot, reset your SATA mode to AHCI and you’re done.

Q: Why is my motherboard repeatedly powering up, starting its fans and then shutdown without completing boot-up?
A: Sounds like your power supply is crow-barring. Your motherboard may have a power rail leaking to ground or your PSU is underrated. Remove the motherboard from the chassis to eliminate a power rail leak and then try again. You may need to upgrade your PSU.


Q: Why is my operating system spontaneously rebooting?
A: A common cause of this type of restarting/rebooting is an underrated power supply. When power demand increases, say during heavy data activity within the operating system, the power supply can’t provide the current and so the voltage levels drop. Upgrade your power supply or come to BVM Limited for assistance with solving this problem.


Q: Why does my operating system freeze just before producing a blue screen of death (BSOD)?
A: This will be your hard drive going offline unexpectedly or worse breaking down. You are probably seeing a STOP: code 0x07B. Check the connections between your HDD and your motherboard and back up your data as soon as you can.
Blue screens of death (BSOD)


Q: Why do blue-screens occur?
A: System instability will cause Windows to stop and show a blue-screen or BSOD. The instability can be caused by malware, faulty hardware or faulty software. The type of error that causes Windows to stop is reported with a STOP: code.


Q: What do the STOP: codes mean?
A:  A STOP: code is a series of five, eight-digit hex numbers that are a look-up to the nature of the instability and to help you get to the cause of the problem. Usually in the form of (V,W,X,Y,Z).


Q: How do I stop Windows automatically restarting so I can read the blue-screen code?
A: Disable the automatic restart in Windows by un-checking the Automatically restart option in the Startup and Recovery window. From Control Panel, click System|Advanced System…|Startup and Recovery Settings.


Q: How can I view the blue-screen code in Windows 10?
A: You can view the code in Event Viewer or the Action Centre. Just type either of those after pressing the Windows-key. Windows 10 will automatically begin troubleshooting steps after a BSOD.


Q: OK, I have written the STOP: code down. Now what?
A: The first hex number is the reference, or identifier. Look that number up here. 

Blue Screens Of Death (BSOD)

Q: Why do blue-screens occur?
A: System instability will cause Windows to stop and show a blue-screen or BSOD. The instability can be caused by malware, faulty hardware or software. The type of error that causes Windows to stop is reported with a STOP: code.

 

Q: What do the STOP: codes mean?
A:  A STOP: code is a series of five, eight-digit hex numbers that are a look-up to the nature of the instability and help you get to the cause of the problem. Usually in the form of (V, W,X,Y,Z).

 

Q: How do I stop Windows automatically restarting so I can read the blue-screen code?
A: Disable the automatic restart in Windows by un-checking the ‘Automatically Restart’ option in the Startup and Recovery window. From Control Panel, click System|Advanced System…|Startup and Recovery Settings.

 

Q: How can I view the blue-screen code in Windows 10?
A: You can view the code in Event Viewer or the Action Centre. Just type either of those after pressing the Windows-key. Windows 10 will automatically begin troubleshooting steps after a BSOD.

Q: OK, I have written the STOP: code down. Now what?
A: The first hex number is the reference, or identifier. Look that number up here.  

 

A leading designer, manufacturer and supplier of industrial and commercial computer products, BVM Ltd are highly qualified to advise on a range of pc issues, common computer problems and faults with computer systems. On the hunt for panel PCs, embedded pc systems and components? BVM distribute their products worldwide, so get in touch today.


 


 

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